While front-end association, shopping and gaming solutions are at the prime of public perception, public cloud computing and its enabling technologies are fencing the massive shift to remote work and entertainment. Office closures, social distancing and shelter-in-place orders have led to sustained demand in users of collaboration, shopping and entertainment services as the entire world transforms personal interactions to virtual ones.

Thus far, that unprecedented shift has gone off. As millions around the world work hard to stay productive, public cloud has enabled video conferencing, remote project collaboration, e-commerce, education, gaming and streaming video companies to meet unexpected-for demand.
Businesses and consumers appreciate the resilience that has been shown in recent weeks by front-end applications like Zoom, Skype and Slack, but it’s the back-end infrastructure of AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud that are keeping those much-needed services running smoothly.
And it’s not just the hyperspaces that are rising to the challenge of a potentially transformative moment in the history of technology.
Due to the coronavirus crisis the sudden shift to remote work and socialization also wouldn’t be possible without software solutions that enable rapid, secure and consistent deployment of application environments.

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The cloud computing applications boom has fundamentally transformed how businesses operate. Virtually every application now runs in the cloud, making it easier than ever to acquire and leverage those applications to make businesses more agile and efficient. The most important that it has enabled a world of mobility where users can be productive from any location, as access to those applications is no longer restricted to being in the office. It has also made possible emergency work-from-home by the coronavirus outbreak.

Cloud computing services companies let customers rent remote computing power, mounting up and down usage, and related costs, as needed.

The cloud has constantly changed the old model of organizations building and owning their servers and data centers, which takes time, requires large up-front capital outlays as well as ongoing maintenance costs, and leaves them with excess computing capacity that goes unused except during brief periods of peak demand.

A business running on the cloud that suffers from outburst in customer traffic to its website can immediately call on servers in a global network of Amazon or Microsoft data centers to handle the load. When the traffic fades, they can turn off those services. Equally, if a company needs to perform a complex analysis or test a machine learning algorithm, it can rent nearly limitless computing power from a cloud provider for a few hours, rather than incurring the cost of owning it.

Sending users data directly to the cloud allows users to connect with speed and security as any amount of bandwidth—even the minimum 1000Mbps provided by Google Fiber, for example. As you see the digital world has utterly changed. If you are still using the desktop applications that can’t provide work from home to your employees, or they’re doing it through a VPN service. It’s about time to think about the transition from desktop to cloud-based application that will open new opportunities to your company and your customers.

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